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Purify Body Cleanse

Intrametica® Purify Body Cleanse is a superfood supplement for everyday use, containing clinically proven bioactive botanicals that, support liver and gut detoxification, gut healing, gentle elimination via the bowel, and blood purification to support clear glowing skin from within.

Detoxification is a natural process that your body does every day, however the human body evolved to cope with a basic diet and a clean chemical free environment. Therefore we need extra assistance to cleanse our system of the toxins built up through urban living. The liver and the colon do most of the detoxification and elimination work but when they are overloaded, toxins can transfer into fat cells, mess with your hormones and steal your energy. The bottom line is if you don’t detoxify effectively, you’ll have trouble losing weight, your skin will be duller and you’ll lose your mojo.

Intrametica®’s Purify Body Cleanse to the rescue. We have designed Purify using scientifically formulated ingredients to support, stimulate and enhance your system – in just a delicious dose of water daily.

Ingredients

  • Proprietary bioavailable St Mary’s Thistle (Silymarin)
  • Organic Dandelion (Taraxicum officinale) whole plant extract powder
  • Organic Emblica officinalis (Amla / Indian gooseberry) fruit powder
  • Organic Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris) cracked cell
  • Organic Broccoli (Brassica oleracea spp Italica) sprout powder
  • Organic Turmeric (Curcuma longa) root powder
  • L-Glutamine
  • L-Glycine
  • Organic High Vitamin D Mushroom Powder
  • Chemical Free Kiwifruit fruit pulp and skin
  • Organic Peppermint leaf powder
  • Diatomaceous Earth (Certified Organic)
  • Pesticide Free Australian grown Green Banana resistant starch
  • Organic Boabab fruit powder
  • Organic Maca powder
  • Organic Sarsaparilla root powder
  • Proprietary blend of Black Rice (Oryxa sativa) and Cactus Flowers (Opuntia ficus)
  • Organic Marshmallow root powder
  • Organic Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis) leaf gel powder
  • Organic Lemon whole fruit powder
  • Organic Carrot juice (root) powder
  • Organic Beetroot (Beta vulgaris) root juice powder
  • Organic Kakadu plum whole fruit powder
  • Organic Acerola Cherry fruit powder
  • Organic Cacao (Theobroma cacao) raw bean/pod powder
  • Bacillus coagulans
  • Zinc gluconate
  • Selenomethionine
  • Vitamin A (Retinyl Palmitate)

The Evidence

Cut to the chase:

Helps to keep your liver healthy

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Intrametica’s Purify Body Cleanse contains a patented botanical derivative from Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. Commonly referred to as Milk Thistle, the plant has been used for centuries to address liver health 1. Our clinically trialled ingredient in which silybin, one of the main bioactive constituents in milk thistle, is associated with Non-GMO soy phospholipids to significantly improve bioavailability. For maximum efficacy, our Milk Thistle is standardized to contain ≥29.7% to ≤36.3% of silybin by HPLC 2.

Our delivery platform vastly improves the absorption of silybin, the active constituent in Milk Thistle and is supported by pharmacological and clinical data:

  • Greatly improves bioavailability of silybin, a compound otherwise characterized by poor absorption.
  • 10-fold higher liver bioavailability over the simple extract used in most products, calculated by biliary excretion also on humans.
  • Maintains healthy liver function, protecting it from oxidative stress 3, and could be used as a complementary approach to liver related challenges 4,5,6.
  • Improves insulin resistance and certain liver markers in plasma 7,8.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll have healthy and regular number 2’s

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Bacillus coagulans (BC), formerly Lactobacillus Sporogenes, is a gram-positive, lactic-acid producing, spore-forming transient colonising probiotic that supports healthy digestive and immune function. The mechanisms by which this probiotic exerts its therapeutic actions are by promoting healthy gastrointestinal flora and ecology, such as promoting the growth of bacteriocins, antagonising pathogenic bacteria. BC also produce short-chain fatty acids that nourish the colonic mucosa which supports healthy bowel motility and immune function (Figure 1). According to the literature the biggest advantages of a “spore-based” probiotic is they are composed of endosomes which are highly resistant to acidic pH, are stable at room temperature, and deliver a much greater quantity of high viability bacteria to the small intestine then that traditional probiotic supplements. BC spores are activated in the acidic environment of the stomach and begin germinating and proliferating in the intestine. Its optimum temperature for growth is 50 Degrees Celsius; the range of temperatures tolerated by BC are 30–55 Degrees Celsius, making it a perfect option as a shelf-stable probiotic. BC replenishes the gut microbiome, boosts immunity, improves digestion & targets and eliminates pathogenic bacteria. Much research has been done on BC in the past 10 years and several recent studies in particular have indicated BC to be a powerful catalyst in significantly improving abdominal pain and bloating in people with IBS and other related symptoms. BC has been studied in human clinical trials for the treatment of diarrhoea including viral diarrhoea in children, traveller’s diarrhoea, and diarrhoea caused by antibiotics; digestion problems; irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn’s disease and infection due to the ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter). Vaginal administration of BC provided complete relief of discharge and pruritis after 14 days of administration in 91% of subjects due to, the beneficial change in vaginal acidity via lactic acid production. BC may positively affect lipid levels, it is thought to be due to the ability to bind cholesterol in the gut, and possible inhibition of the cholesterol-producing enzyme HMG-CoA reductase 9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll digest your food more efficiently

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Kiwifruit are exceptionally high in vitamins C, E, K, folate, carotenoids, potassium, fibre, and phytochemicals acting in synergy to achieve multiple health benefits. Kiwifruit, as part of a healthy diet, may increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and decrease triglycerides, platelet aggregation, and elevated blood pressure. Consuming gold kiwifruit with iron-rich meals improves poor iron status, and green kiwifruit aids digestion and laxation. As a rich source of antioxidants, they may protect the body from endogenous oxidative damage. Kiwifruit may support immune function and reduce the incidence and severity of cold or flu-like illness, in at-risk groups such as older adults and children. Studies have shown kiwifruit to:

  • Improve digestion of proteins,
  • Promote the growth of good bacteria (Prebiotic effects with combination of fruit pulp and high polyphenol content of fruit skin),
  • Inhibit gut pathogen growth, and
  • Regulate bowel function and relieve constipation

A small study showed that patients reported a significant reduction in the bloated feeling after consumption of kiwi. Patient satisfaction scores improved significantly with consumption of kiwi – measure by stool bulk, ease of defecation. No effect of age, gender or BMI was observed. Improvements continued to be recorded over the period of kiwi consumption 17,18,19.

The proprietary Kiwifruit used in Intrametica’s Purify Body Cleanse enhances digestion by increasing protease activity (the enzyme which supports protein digestion) breaking down food proteins into more bioactive/absorbable peptides.

Cut to the chase:

Reduce acne and increase hair growth

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Our proprietary and clinically studied blend of Black Rice and Cactus Flowers counteracts the effects induced by testosterone treatment in human facial sebocytes of the skin. The combination of the antioxidant effect of these concentrates with the 5-α-reductase inhibition activity results in, the synergistic protective effects of the blend against the biological mechanisms implicated in acne, and alopecia skin disorders in scalp and cutaneous cells. Black Rice is high in anthocyanin content and has been shown to inhibit inflammation and enhance total plasma antioxidant capacity. Cactus flower concentrate contains different flavonoids notably kaempferol and quercetin as well as gallic acid, and has been used traditionally to treat wounds both topically and taken as part of the diet. Gallic acid exhibits high antioxidant activity responsible for its ability to reduce DNA damage and to buffer free radicals. The well-known antioxidant effect of anthocyanins contained in Black Rice used in combination with, the hormonal balancing effect of Cactus Flower flavonoids (isorhamnetin and derivatives) can produce a synergistic protective effect in sebocytes and hair dermal papilla cells against the alterations involved in acne and alopecia. Acne and alopecia (hair loss) are common dermatological disorders with multifactorial pathogenesis mainly related to genetic and hormonal mechanisms. However, recent experimental evidence has supported the hypothesis that other factors (especially oxidative stress caused by free radicals) play an important role in the pathophysiology of these skin disorders. In more detail, free radicals can attack membrane lipids and induce their peroxidation, resulting in cell damage and dysfunctions. Intrametica’s Purify Body Cleanse contains Black Rice and Cactus Flower concentrates which act in a synergistic way against acne and alopecia (hair loss) by strengthening antioxidant cell defence, and protection against unbalanced hormonal effects. In fact, a strict correlation between the free radical scavenger and the antiandrogenic activities has already been observed in these two herbal extracts. Furthermore, experimental studies using in vitro models have proven that our blend of Black Rice and Cactus Flowers is able to promote hair growth in men and women by, inducing a significant increase in proliferation of dermal papilla cells of human hair follicles (Fig.2). Moreover, it counteracts effects induced by testosterone imbalances in human facial sebocytes of skin causing acne (Fig .2) 20,21,22,23,24,25.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll have firmer and more youthful skin

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It’s a tough call but Kakadu Plum, out of all our wonderful fruits in this formulation, is still the bomb when it comes to delivering on Vitamin C! Sourced and prepared exclusively in Australia, our certified organic Kakadu Plum is divine. The phenolic ellagic acid (EA) is receiving increasing attention for its nutritional and pharmacological potential as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agent. The Australian native Kakadu plum fruit is an abundant source of this phytochemicals. There are two structural proteins that help to keep our skin plump and prevent sagging. These are known as collagen and elastin. As we age, our collagen and elastin levels naturally decrease, which can lead to the first signs of ageing such as fine lines and wrinkles. Vitamin C helps to promote the formation of these two proteins 26, helping to keep your skin plump and youthful 27.

Cut to the chase:

Less wrinkles for you!

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Acerola Cherry is a fruit that is found throughout Central America and within the northern part of South America. Acerola fruit has high concentrations of vitamin C, and it is considered to be one of the best natural sources of this important vitamin 28. The fruit and skin are packed full of numerous functional phytochemicals, such as carotenoids and polyphenols 29,30. These are important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds necessary for healthy collagen production. The skin of the fruit is red-pink and the flesh is red-orange. Acerola juice has been shown to be effective in suppressing UVB-induced skin pigmentation by inhibiting melanogenesis-related genes. Vitamin C is necessary for building and absorbing collagen. If you are vitamin C deficient you will not be able to metabolise collagen properly. Subclinical scurvy = collagen deficiency. Microheamoraging can occur and vitamin C is very important together with flavonoids to support healthy microcirculation in the skin.

Cut to the chase:

More natural UV protection

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Carrot is a significant source of phytonutrients including phenolics, polyacetylenes and carotenoids. Of these carotenoids, β-carotene is classified as a functional ingredient with significant health promoting properties. Human studies have shown β-Carotene to be photo-protective, that is, it protects the skin from sun damage and sunburn and helps prevent premature ageing, as it inhibits free radical and singlet oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes in the skin and indeed, the entire body. Further, skin concentrations can be increased with supplementation and are lower in persons with oxidative stress (e.g., smokers). Similarly, plasma and skin carotenoids decrease with UV exposure. This relationship between carotenoid intake and skin wrinkling may be due to an ability to prevent extracellular matrix breakdown. Clinical trials in humans show that supplementing up to 30 mg a day of beta-carotene demonstrated benefits for the prevention and repair of photo-aging 31,32.

Cut to the chase:

Your number 2s will be the envy of your friends

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Bile is important for thyroid function and is connected to T4 conversion to T3. Sluggish bile can show up as light coloured stools, middle of the night sleep disorders, pain in the right quadrant are just some of the signs of gall bladder and bile congestion. Lemon and water in warm water, beetroot, dandelion root and bitter green leafy vegetables are all helpful to support healthy bile flow. Bitter is better! It triggers the release of bile from the gall bladder and assists fat digestion and the eliminatory functions of the bowels 33. Dandelion root protects the liver and is traditionally used in both Western and Chinese medicine to support the digestive system 34,35. In-vivo studies are also showing promising effects of Dandelion root and flower extracts for protection of human skin fibroblasts from UVB damage, cellular senescence and inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells 36.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll have skin that glows

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Beets contain phytonutrients called betalains, which give beets their red color, have been studied for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and for detoxification support 37. The active constituent, betalain, is known to have anti-inflammatory and high antioxidant properties as well as, increasing nitric oxide availability and have been researched for their role in ameliorating hypertension and endothelial function. Beetroot has a high inorganic nitric content, which provides its benefits by reducing to nitric oxide (NO). NO is a messenger molecule with important vascular and metabolic functions. Beetroot is a rich source of phytochemical compounds such as ascorbic acid, carotenoids, phenolic acids and flavonoids and the bioactive pigments betalains, which are all responsible for the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of beetroot 38.

Cut to the chase:

This stuff hunts down and eliminates toxins

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Emblica officinalis Gaertn or Phyllanthus emblica Linn, commonly known as the Indian gooseberry in English or Amla in Hindi, is one of the most important medicinal and dietary plants in the Indian subcontinent 39. The fruits are of dietary and medicinal use and have wide applications in both traditional and folk systems of medicine. Scientific studies have shown Amla to be effective in preventing/ameliorating the toxic effects of hepatotoxic agents like ethanol, paracetamol, carbon tetrachloride, heavy metals, ochratoxins, hexachlorocyclohexane, antitubercular drugs and hepatotoxicity resulting from iron overload 40,41. Amla is also reported to impart beneficial effects on liver function and to mitigate hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome. Amla possesses protective effects against chemical-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in animal models of study 42. Additionally, the phytochemicals quercetin, gallic acid, corilagin and ellagic acid are also reported to protect against the cytotoxic effects of paracetamol, microcystins, galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide. The hepatoprotective actions of Amla appear to be mediated by its free radical scavenging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and modulation of the xenobiotic detoxification process and lipid metabolism 43,44,45.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll lose weight quicker and get sick less

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Chlorella is a unicellular green microalgae popular as functional food and alternative medicine worldwide, particularly in Asia. It is used as a dietary supplement because it porvides high amount of amino acids (apart from methionine and tyrosine), minerals, vitamins, fiber and bioactive compounds. Many studies have reported beneficial physiological effects against oxidation, cataract, bacterial and viral infection, and inflammation as well as weight loss, hypoglycemic and hypocholesterolemic effects in rats, mice and other laboratory animals. It is also known as a chelating agent for certain environmental toxins and heavy metals. Chlorella supplementation was studied in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and compared with placebo, those on Chlorella could lose weight better, and had better serum glucose levels and improved lipid profile as well as liver function 46,47.

Cut to the chase:

Your Mum will be happy you’re eating your broccoli

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Broccoli is a cruciferious vegetable which is responsible for aiding the livers detoxification process, such as oxidation and hydrozylation of xenobiotics. Broccoli sprouts are high in glucoraphanin which is known to protect the liver against damage, as they induce the phase I and phase II liver enzymes (in vitro and in vivo). In animal studies it has shown that the continued ingestion of broccoli sprouts involves an up-regulation of the liver detoxification pathways, and glutathione synthesis showing that broccoli sprouts enhanced defensive functions and protected against toxicities of various types of xenobiotic substances through, the induction of detoxification enzymes and glutathione synthesis in the liver.

The liver is the largest digestive gland and is responsible for very important tasks in the human body such as, the detoxification and metabolism of many substances (environmental toxins, xenobiotics, etc.), hormones and glycogen storage. Plant materials especially broccoli sprouts are hepatoprotective (liver protective) due to their high antioxidant status.

Broccoli and Broccoli sprouts are high in glucosinolates which have an chemoprotective effect with studies showing that prostate PC-3, pancreatic and the risk of premenopausal breast cancer was shown to be inversely associated with broccoli consumption.

Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli sprouts) are also high in Calcium-D-Glucurate, which once metabolized works to increase glucuronidation in phase II liver detoxification pathway to increase the excretion of carcinogens, steroid hormones and other lipid-soluble toxins as they are conjugated and then excreted via the bile. Inhibition of beta-glucuronidase activity allows the body to excrete hormones such as estrogen before they can be reabsorbed lowering the serum estrogen levels by 23%. Not only do they reduce the serum estrogen levels, it also reduces total serum cholesterol by up to 12%, LDL by 28% and triglycerides by 43%. Both of these effects are due to improved enterohepatic circulation, resulting in increase excretion of bile acids and a reduction in cholesterol biosynthesis 48,49,50,51.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll have a stronger gut barrier

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In addition to its important role in digestion, absorption and secretion, the gastrointestinal epithelium serves as a barrier to the diffusion of toxins, allergens and pathogens from the luminal contents into the interstitial tissue. Barrier disruption and diffusion of noxious substances are known to induce mucosal inflammation and tissue injury. In fact, the disruption of gut barrier function plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of numerous gastrointestinal diseases such as, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), celiac disease and infectious enterocolitis. The specialized junctional complexes called tight junctions provide the intestinal epithelial barrier function. Loss of tight junction integrity and increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules are associated with the pathogenesis of IBD, IBS and coeliac disease. Mucosal protective factors such as growth factors and nutrients preserve the gut barrier integrity and are beneficial in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases. L-Glutamine the most abundant amino acid in blood plays a vital role in the maintenance of mucosal integrity. Glutamine is traditionally termed as a nonessential amino acid, is now considered a “conditionally essential” amino acid. Its consumption in small bowel mucosa exceeds the rate of production during catabolic stress such as trauma, sepsis and post surgery. In the small bowel mucosa, glutamine is a unique nutrient providing fuel for metabolism, regulating cell proliferation, repair and maintaining the gut barrier functions 52,53.

Cut to the chase:

Your digestive system will be supported

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Glycine is found in high amounts in the human body as it is one of the main components of the most abundant protein in the body, collagen. Collagen is found mostly in fibrous tissue such as tendons, ligaments, skin, cartilage, blood vessels, and the gut. Glycine is considered a “non-essential” amino acid, which simply means that it is so important the liver can actually make it should it become necessary. The liver also uses glycine for detoxification and this process is limited by the amount of glycine available. Glycine improves digestive health, regulates inflammation, protects the mucosal barrier, and improves enterocyte function in the intestinal tract. It protects against systemic endotoxin damage from leaky gut. Glycine also protects the liver and aids in detoxification and bile acid production. Finally, glycine improves fructose malabsorption 54,55.

Cut to the chase:

Healthy bones and tissues = healthy you

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The “sunshine” vitamin is a hot topic that attracted ample attention over the past decades especially that a considerable proportion of the worldwide population is deficient in this essential nutrient. Vitamin D was primarily acknowledged for its importance in bone formation, however; increasing evidence point to its interference with the proper function of nearly every tissue in our bodies including brain, heart, muscles, immune system and skin.

Vitamin D is actually a fat-soluble prohormone steroid that has endocrine, paracrine and autocrine functions. The endocrine effects of vitamin D are mainly involved in serum calcium homeostasis.

Both calcium and Vitamin D perform important and interacting functions in regulating the skin differentiation process, as well as regulating skin barrier function and protecting it from infections through its role in, supporting cutaneous innate and adaptive immunity. Vitamin D exerts effects on regulating sebaceous gland activity, promoting wound healing and providing photoprotection. A number of epidemiologic studies have suggested that vitamin D may have a protective effect decreasing cancer risk, and cancer-associated mortality and Vitamin D deficiency was more frequent in patients with acne, and serum 25(OH)D levels were inversely correlated with acne severity, especially in patients with inflammatory lesions 56.

Freshly grown organic mushrooms are exposed to UV-B light for a very short period of time, assisting the mushroom into producing precise levels of vitamin D in a natural way. As a result, mushrooms can easily provide 100 percent of the recommended value of vitamin D. Mushrooms are the only source of vitamin D in the produce aisle and one of very few non-fortified food sources of this important vitamin 57,58,59,60,61.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll feel great and fart less

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Peppermint is traditionally used in herbal medicine as an antispasmodic because it relaxes the bowel, calms nausea and helps prevent gas and bloating. Peppermint is an astringent, antiseptic, antipruritic, antiemetic, carminative, diaphoretic, mild bitter, analgesic, anticatarrhal, antimicrobial, rubefacient, stimulant, and emmenagogue. Peppermint is currently used to treat irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, gallbladder and biliary tract disorders, and liver complaints 62,63,64,65.

Cut to the chase:

Healthy hair and nails

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Composed of approximately 85% orthosilic (not crystalline) silica, Diatomaceous Earth is derived from the fossilized remains of tiny, aquatic organisms called “diatoms” that are formed from microscopic, algae-like plant remains in the earth’s surface. Silica carries an electric charge that attaches to free-radical toxins, whereby the silica particles then neutralise the free-radical charge, before removing them from the body and dramatically slowing oxidative damage 66,67,68,69,70,71,72. Our Food-Grade Diatomaceous Earth has been checked for purity and identity against published pharmacopeia ensuring you are getting quality every time.

Cut to the chase:

You will have less wrinkles

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According to The Journal of Nutrition, Baobab has the highest antioxidant content of any fruit. Baobab powder has twice the antioxidants gram per gram of goji berries, and more than blueberries and pomegranates combined. Baobab is packed with antioxidants and vitamin C which supports collagen formation – helping to give you radiant, glowing skin as well as preventing wrinkles. It’s a must have in your daily beauty and wellness routine. Also found in Australia and Madagascar, Africa’s “Tree of Life” contains almost 50% fibre (two thirds soluble and one third insoluble, making it a powerful prebiotic). Plant food prebiotics powerfully influence healthy microflora in the digestive system, which in turn supports a healthy complexion. As a source of calcium, magnesium and potassium, it’s no wonder this is Africa’s favourite superfruit! 73,74,75,76

Cut to the chase:

You’ll have more energy for everything – including sex

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Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) is a traditional Andean crop belonging to the Brassicaceae family that grows at altitudes between 3500 and 4500 m above sea level in the central Andean region of Peru. This area is characterised by barren and rocky terrains with intense sunlight, strong winds and freezing temperatures and is traditionally used to increase mental and physical energy, improve infertility and treat menopausal symptoms 77,78 . In randomised clinical trials, Maca showed a positive effect on mild erectile dysfunction 79, and it has been shown to improve sexual desire in healthy menopausal women 80. These studies provide preliminary evidence supporting the effectiveness of Maca 81. Biological and pharmacological studies of Maca using animal models have reported various health-related properties, such as a fertility-increasing effect82 and positive effects on sexual performance83, spermatogenesis84, osteoporosis85, neuronal function86, memory impairment87, chemical and physical stress responses88, prostatic hyperplasia89, and enhancing Luteinising Hormone (LH) serum levels of pituitary hormones during the pro-oestrus LH surge90. Macamides and polysaccharides found in Maca, especially, black Maca, are strong antioxidants and confer beneficial effects for skin health91.

Cut to the chase:

Your skin will be firm and bright

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Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight causes distinct changes in collagenous skin tissues as a result of the breakdown of collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix. Ultraviolet irradiation induced sun exposure down regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-elimination pathways, thereby promoting the production of ROS, which are implicated in skin aging. Sarsaparilla root has been included in Intrametica Purify Body Cleanse as it protects against oxidative damage and skin-aging92, while supporting the relief of inflammatory and bacterial skin conditions93,94. Traditionally Sarsaparilla root was used in herbal medicine as a depurative blood cleansing tonic to treat skin conditions95.

Cut to the chase:

Your digestive tract will repair and maintain repair while taking

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While Marshmallow roots extracts have been shown to protect against UVA-induced oxidative stress in topical formulations96, we employ the healing and protective effects of Marshmallow root powder in our Purify formulation to repair the mucous membranes of the gastrointestinal system97,98,99,100,101. Interestingly, the root extract of A. officinalis exhibits antibacterial effects on S. mutans and L. acidophilus, but this effect was less than those of Chlorhexidine mouthwash and penicillin. The antibacterial effect increased with an increase in the concentration of the extract102. Therefore, we suggest taking this away from any of your Lactobacillus-containing probiotics. Another reason we included Bacillus coagulans in our symbiotic formulation because you won’t have to worry about this interaction with our products!

Cut to the chase:

Your skin will be firmer and you’ll have less wrinkles

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Aloe Vera is a highly regarded botanical used topically for wound healing and skin repair103. The dietary supplementation of this amazing plant is showing promise as a must-have in your tool kit for the prevention of premature skin ageing. Did you know aloe vera, taken internally, improves facial wrinkles and elasticity and it increases the type I procollagen gene expression in human skin in vivo. Thirty healthy female subjects over the age of 45 were recruited and they received 2 different doses (low-dose: 1,200 mg/d, high-dose: 3,600 mg/d) of aloe vera gel supplementation for 90 days. Their baseline status was used as a control. At baseline and at completion of the study, facial wrinkles were measured using a skin replica, and facial elasticity was measured by an in vivo suction skin elasticity meter. Skin samples were taken before and after aloe intake to compare the type I procollagen and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) mRNA levels by performing real-time RT-PCR. After aloe gel intake, the facial wrinkles improved significantly (p<0.05) in both groups, and facial elasticity improved in the lower-dose group. In the photoprotected skin, the type I procollagen mRNA levels were increased in both groups, albeit without significance; the MMP-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in the higher-dose group. Type I procollagen immunostaining was substantially increased throughout the dermis in both groups104.

The active constituents of aloe vera are glycoproteins, anthraquinones and polysaccharies which, exert their effect as an antioxidant compound to protect tissue against oxidative damage that is caused by free radicals. The extract also significantly increased superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in the liver and kidneys while also, demonstrating immune-stimulating capabilities due to the promotion of macrophage cytokine production (TNF, IL-6). Aloe vera gel taken internally acts as a mild laxative due to the anthraquinones as they increase the intestinal water content which stimulates the mucus secretion and induces intestinal peristalsis to aid in detoxification105.

Cut to the chase:

Chemicals will be flushed from your body

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Citrus fruits are high in ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and flavonoids, which, provide the phytonutrient and health benefits alongside the dietary fibre, minerals, carotenoids and essential oils that all combined provide the biological health benefits. Lemon provides antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capability106. Citrus limonoids have the ability to increase the activity of phase II detoxification enzymes which may have potential benefits in prevention of xenobioitic related disease107.

Cut to the chase:

Your skin will be hydrated and smooth

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High antioxidant properties of cacao controls cell damage and tumour progression due to the large number of phytochemicals and physiologically active compounds such as polyphenols, flavonoids and procyanidins that also provide anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic and immune modulating, anti-microbial vasodilatory and analgesic effects. Cacao also provides anit-inflammatory properties due to the down regulation of NF,kB. Ancient medicinal plant with over 100 medicinal uses used for treating various diseases and disorders, specifically traditional evidence has shown cacao used for anaemia, mental fatigue and fever108. The ingestion of high flavanol cocoa increases in blood flow of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, and to increases in skin density and skin hydration. Studies have shown significant decreases of skin roughness and scaling, inflammation and hydration levels following 12 weeks’ consumption of cacoa109. Flavanol-rich cocoa consumption acutely increases microcirculation / dermal blood flow and oxygen saturation in the body110,111,112. In moderately photo-aged women, regular cocoa flavanol consumption had positive effects on facial wrinkles and elasticity in a double blind randomised controlled clinical trial113.

Cut to the chase:

Clearer skin, less acne and more energy

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The anti-inflammatory properties of zinc have been the reasons for its use in many common inflammatory dermatoses like acne, rosacea, eczemas, and ulcers and wounds of varied etiology114. Zinc has been used extensively both topically and systemically for the management of acne vulgaris115 and is also, another emerging alternate acne treatment to reduce possible adverse effects of antibiotics and in view of Propionibacterium acnes strains developing resistance to conventional antibiotics116. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of zinc have been postulated to be useful in the management of acne rosacea, and for the management of other follicular occlusion disorders like hidradenitis suppurativa, acne conglobata, and folliculitis decalvans as well117,118,119,120,121,122.

Zinc has a protective potential against many chronic conditions associated with oxidative stress through its role in boosting the induction of transcription factors (including (ARE)-Nrf2 signaling – a major target in skin ageing food focus!) and a subsequent up-regulation of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, induction of metallothionein synthesis, its structural role in copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), and, finally, its direct antioxidant activity123.

Zinc is an essential trace mineral. It’s important for growth and development, thyroid function, liver function, the immune system, reproductive system, and the nervous system. Zinc also protects the liver against damage from alcohol, free radicals, malnutrition, all kinds of stress, and over-exercise/excess sweating. Zinc is a critical co-factor for thyroid hormone production and conversion, as well. It helps to produce thyroid stimulating hormone – TSH – and is a necessary component for the body’s ability to convert T4 hormone into T3 hormone, which is what helps your cells to produce ATP energy, raise basal body temperature, keep your weight at its ideal place, burn calories, and lose weight if you need to. Zinc is at the center of your entire metabolic process. As it happens, so is copper, but your body requires a whole lot more zinc than it does copper. The two minerals need to be kept in balance, along with manganese.

Cut to the chase:

More healthy number 2s.

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Curcumin is a well-known molecule found in Turmeric with multiple pharmacological activities that have the potential to be used to treat many gastrointestinal diseases, both functional and organic. Intrametics Purify formulation contains curcumin with phospholipids allowing us to overcome the bioavailability problems associated with curcumin124, by markedly improving intestinal absorption compared with, the traditional unformulated curcuminoid mixtures. Curcumin has the following 4 basic effects on the hepatobiliary system: (1) Choleretic-cholagogue; (2) Antifibrotic; (3) Hepatoprotective; and (4) Antioxidant. The choleretic effect of curcumin increases bile production by approximately 62% 125.

Cut to the chase:

You’ll feel healthier and also fuller for longer

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A 100% natural source of resistant starch, made from nutritious green lady finger bananas grown on the Atherton Tablelands in tropical Far North Queensland.

BENEFITS

  • The world’s highest quality, most potent resistant starch to heal your gut and restore your body’s healthy balance
  • The ultimate multi-fibre nutritional supplement-a unique combination of soluble, insoluble and fermentable fibre to promote gut health and assist in the prevention of colorectal diseases
  • High in prebiotic fibre, to nourish beneficial gut bacteria and support your immune system by promoting a healthy microbiome 126,127
  • Rich in inulin to regulate digestion and improve your metabolism, helping you feel fuller for longer, and maintain a healthy weight 128
  • An excellent source of 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan) / serotonin to balance your mood, prevent headaches and migraine and improve sleep
  • High in minerals-including potassium, zinc, magnesium, phosphorous and manganese
  • Helps regulate blood sugar to support the prevention and treatment of diabetes 129
  • Helps to lower blood pressure and cholesterol 130
  • Increases the antioxidant capacity of food
  • Increases mineral absorption-especially calcium-and aids in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis

Southern Cross University (New South Wales, Australia) testing showed significantly high levels of;

  • 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan)
  • Tryptophan
  • Chlorogenic acids, caffeic acids
  • Flavonoids (as rutin)
  • Proanthocyanadins
  • Resistant starch fibre

Cut to the chase:

Your family will love you more

Want the evidence?

Selenium is an essential trace element with the Se-methionine form is more bioavailable with the amount available in food solely dependent on the amount available in the soil 131. Low selenium status has been associated with: loss of immunocompetence, increased risk of certain cancers, reduced male fertility, greater incidence of depression, anxiety, confusion and hostility, compromised thyroid hormone metabolism, asthma, RA, increased inflammatory processes, changes in drug metabolisim via cytochrome P450 system. The main action of selenium is in the antioxidant systems as it is an integral part of thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione peroxidases as these enzymes are involved in controlling tissue levels of free radicals and maintain cell-mediated immunity. Selenium is required for normal thyroid hormone synthesis, activation and metabolism. Anti-inflammatory function of selenium is due to the increase in glutathione levels and immune parameters. Selenium protects against toxicity of some heavy metals including cadmium, arsenic, lead, silver and mercury 132,133,134,135.

Cut to the chase:

Healthy skin, strong hair and nails

Want the evidence?

Vitamin A plays an essential role in skin’s health. Vitamin A deficiency causes abnormal visual adaptation to darkness but also dramatically affects the cutaneous biology as dry skin, dry hair and broken fingernails are among the first manifestations of vitamin A deficiency. This nutrient, which is stored in the liver, is found also in the skin, particularly in the sebaceous glands, known to express retinoid receptors. Troubled blemished skin is linked to malfunctions in the sebaceous gland. While this is driven by several factors, vitamin A controls and regulates this gland and kills unfriendly bacteria growth in the skin 136,137,138.

Dosage

Adults – Take two flat teaspoons a day (6 grams) with 200mL of water, juice or sprinkle over food or add to your favourite smoothie blend or as professionally prescribed by your healthcare practitioner.

Children – Not suitable for children under 15 years unless specifically prescribed by a qualified healthcare practitioner.

Cautions

Not recommended for use during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

Consult your healthcare professional before use if you have had renal calculi (kidney stones). Ascorbic acid may increase the risk of recurrence of calcium oxalate calculi.

Contains fish protein. Use caution with known allergies to this form of protein.

Contains Kiwifruit. Use caution with known kiwifruit allergies.
Always read the label.

Contraindications and Drug Interactions

Allergy: Use of Aloe vera preparations should be avoided in individuals with a known allergy to plants of the Liliaceae family (garlic, onions, and tulips; Ulbricht et al. 2008).

Pregnancy: Use of Aloe vera as a laxative during pregnancy may pose potential teratogenic and toxicological effects on the embryo and fetus (World Health Organization 1999; Ulbricht et al. 2008).

Renal or cardiac disease: Prolonged use of Aloe vera latex has been associated with watery diarrhea resulting in electrolyte imbalance (Cooke 1981; Boudreau and Beland 2006), and anecdotal reports suggest that the increasing loss of potassium may lead to hypokalemia. Therefore, the Aloe vera latex is contraindicated in patients with a history of renal or cardiac disorders.

Drug interactions: Potential interactions have been suggested for Aloe vera and drugs that may alter electrolyte balance, such as thiazide diuretics and corticosteroids. Possible hypokalemia-related arrhythmia suggests a potential herb–drug interaction with cardiac glycosides. Caution is warranted in patients taking hypoglycemic agents as interactions with Aloe vera gel have been reported (Boudreau and Beland 2006). There exists a case report of a 35-year-old woman who lost 5 L of blood during surgery as a result of a possible herb-drug interaction between Aloe vera and sevoflurane, an inhibitor of thromboxane A2 (Lee et al. 2004).

Drug/Vitamin Bioavailability

Aloe vera gel has been shown to enhance vitamin C and E’s bioavailability in a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial (Vinson, Al Kharrat, and Andreoli 2005). The authors suggest that Aloe vera gel protects against the degradation of vitamins in the intestinal tract and the gel polysaccharides may bind to vitamins and thereby slow down their absorption rate.

Medicine Interactions

Aloe vera gel has been shown to significantly increase the transport of insulin in a cell model, and limited information suggests that if co-administered, it may also enhance the intestinal absorption of other poorly absorbed drugs (Hamman 2008).

Zinc may decrease the absorption and efficacy of some medications. If taking tetracycline or quinolone antibiotics separate doses by at least two hours.

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